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New research from Nielsen finds that manufacturers are missing out on millions in revenue by not stating the protein content on their packaging.

That is because sales of items that do list protein content have leapt by 22 per cent in Australia, compared to two per cent in total grocery growth, according to the researcher, with the fastest growth in dairy and chilled meals.

The trend is even stronger in the US which saw a 157 per cent increase in sales of products that listed protein content in just one year.

This huge increase in demand for protein presents a major opportunity for manufacturers to ride the wave and boost sales, according to Nielsen.

New products in the meat alternatives, peanut butter and ice cream categories are among those addressing consumers’ protein desires, prompting incremental category growth of between 16 and 54 per cent.

Other categories, such as nutritious snacks with protein claims, saw six per cent growth in the past year, while products that qualified for a high protein claim, but failed to list protein content on packaging, grew just three per cent.

Nielsen’s head of retail Alfredo Costa said: “We are confident that the demand for protein will continue into the future, and... products with clear protein claims will remain sought after on Australians’ grocery lists.

“Manufacturers need to meet their consumers’ needs and desires with clearly labelled information on packs if they want to have a winning edge with product innovation and drive sales,” Costa said.

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