• A meat substitute (left) resembles chicken meat (right), but its proteins are not absorbed as well by human cells.
Credit: Adapted from Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2022, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.2c01711
    A meat substitute (left) resembles chicken meat (right), but its proteins are not absorbed as well by human cells. Credit: Adapted from Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2022, DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.2c01711
Close×

A study in the US shows human cells absorb less protein from plant-based meat than from chicken, with researchers saying the findings will drive further studies on what ingredients could boost the peptide uptake of alternative meats.

The paper was reported in the American Chemical Society (ACS) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

“To mimic the look and texture of the real thing, plants are dehydrated into a powder and mixed with seasonings. Then, the mixtures are typically heated, moistened and processed through an extruder.

“These products are often thought of as being more healthful than animal meats because the plants used to make them are high in protein and low in undesirable fats,” the researchers from Ohio State University said.

Lab tests showed proteins in substitutes did not break down into peptides as well as conventional meats.

The team made a model meat alternative made from soy and wheat gluten, with a similar fibrous structure as chicken.

The model and chicken were cooked, ground up, and the broken down with an enzyme humans use to digest food.

The plant-based meat peptides were less water-soluble than chicken and no absorbed as well as the chicken.

The researches said this knowledge could be used to develop more healthful products.

Full study is here.

Packaging News

An agreement struck between Cleanaway and Viva Energy will see the two companies undertake a prefeasibility assessment of a circular solution for soft plastics and other hard-to-recycle plastics.

Industry groups and local manufacturers, including Kimberly-Clark Australia, have voiced approval of the government's Future Made in Australia Act announced by Prime Minister Anthony Albanese, although there's recognition that the plan needs "fleshing out".

PKN’s latest issue for 2024 is hitting desks, which includes our comprehensive review of APPEX 2024, a preview of drupa, and features on Labels, Sustainability, F&B Packaging, and Design.