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Archie Rose is constructing a new distillery and bond store at Botany that has sustainability at its heart.

Sydney spirits company Archie Rose Distilling Co. recently embarked on the construction of its second distillery and bond store. It is scheduled for completion in the middle of the year.

The new distillery is located in Botany, just four kilometres away from Archie Rose’s original distillery in Rosebery, which opened in 2014 and produces a diverse range of whiskies, gins, vodkas and rums, as well as one-off collaborations and limited release products.

The new distillery will enable the brand to increase its commitment to innovation and progression in distilling.

It will free up additional capacity for R&D projects, limited release products, and a greater focus on sustainable distilling practices.

Once completed, the Botany site will also enable Archie Rose to bring its existing whisky stock into a centralised bond store to better monitor maturation and provide additional capacity for gin, vodka and whisky production.

This will see the Rosebery distillery dedicated exclusively to R&D projects and limited release trials that explore the fringes of spirits production.

“Once the Botany site is completed we’ll dedicate our current Rosebery distillery entirely to R&D, limited release trials and the weirder innovation projects we are constantly undertaking and love to work on,” Archie Rose founder Will Edwards says.

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