• FOODiQ Global has conducted an academic literature review on 100 per cent juice, funded by Hort Innovation and AUSVEG. The research found that it may have anti-inflammatory properties and lead to improved blood pressure.
Source: Getty Images
    FOODiQ Global has conducted an academic literature review on 100 per cent juice, funded by Hort Innovation and AUSVEG. The research found that it may have anti-inflammatory properties and lead to improved blood pressure. Source: Getty Images
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An academic literature review on the potential health benefits of 100 per cent juice found it may have anti-inflammatory properties and lead to improved blood pressure. The study was commissioned by Hort Innovation and AUSVEG and completed by food and nutrition science organisation, FOODiQ Global.

Fruit and vegetable juice that is categorised as 100 per cent juice means it contains no added sugars or other sweeteners. Although there has been concern over the high natural sugar levels present in these products, academic research has so far shown them to have potential health benefits, rather than negative impacts.

Conducted via an umbrella review of scientific studies looking into 100 per cent juice’s potential health impacts, FOODiQ’s research highlighted the cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties of the products. This review aims to assist policy-makers in making decisions surrounding regulation and marketing for 100 per cent juices.

They also contain nutrients and bioactives naturally produced by plants, with numerous health benefits. The study particularly looked into their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

Health concerns stem from the high natural sugar contents of fruits, and the way that juicing process reduces dietary fibre, which leads to suspected health impacts including obesity and dental issues. FOODiQ's review found these claims were unfounded.

Although there are limited studies looking at 100 per cent vegetable juices, and studies involving 100 per cent fruit juices are often compared to sugar sweetened drinks, the review suggests that there could be benefits to incorporating these products into Australian diets.

FOODiQ Global CEO, Dr Flávia Fayet-Moore, said that the scientific evidence showed that 100 per cent fruit juice can be beneficial for markers of heart health and limit inflammation, with limited evidence for harm.

“The general rhetoric around orange juice, for example, is that it’s not good for your health because it’s high in sugars. On average, a 250ml glass of 100 per cent orange juice has about the same calories and sugars as 1.15 oranges, and now, there is evidence it has many benefits, which challenges this thinking,” she said.

FOODiQ Global stated that it invites decision makers to review the latest research so consumers can be educated, with an aim to reshape the narrative around 100 per cent juice.

“This research marks the first step in transforming how people think about juice. While changing long-held beliefs won't happen overnight, we aim to provide Australians with an educated, science-led conversation, even if it’s hard to challenge over-simplified logic with complex data,” said Fayet-Moore.

“We encourage everybody, from everyday shoppers to health professionals and policy makers, to revisit their views on juice with an updated, science-backed perspective. This new research supports that 100 per cent juice is a nutritious beverage choice that can be consumed daily, just like its fruit counterpart, but in an easier and more affordable way.”

For the report and further information on the methodology and range of the review, the full paper is available online at Nutrition Reviews.

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