• Saveful CEO Kim McDonnell and Saveful ambassador Matt Moran.
    Saveful CEO Kim McDonnell and Saveful ambassador Matt Moran.
  • Some of Australia's largest food and beverage manufacturers have thrown their support behind Saveful, an intuitive and free app designed to help households save on grocery bills and reduce food waste.
    Some of Australia's largest food and beverage manufacturers have thrown their support behind Saveful, an intuitive and free app designed to help households save on grocery bills and reduce food waste.
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Some of Australia's largest food and beverage manufacturers have thrown their support behind Saveful, an intuitive and free app designed to help households save on grocery bills and reduce food waste.

Launched by the social enterprise, Thankful, and its ambassador chef Matt Moran, the app is designed to save households between $2000-3000 a year.

Some of Australia's largest food and beverage manufacturers have thrown their support behind Saveful, an intuitive and free app designed to help households save on grocery bills and reduce food waste.
 Intuitive, free, and empowering, Saveful is designed to help households reduce food waste, make nutritious meals, and save money.

Saveful CEO Kim McDonnell said 80 per cent of Australians were feeling the pinch of the cost-of-living crisis and wanting practical advice on how to reduce food waste.

“People are looking for ways to save but are throwing one in five bags of the groceries they purchase,” McDonnell said. “From giving those brown avocados sitting on the bench a second life or giving last night’s leftovers a maker, Saveful will not only divert eatable food away from the waste bin, it will also make the tastebuds and wallets of households sing,” McDonnell said.

The app offers a personalised user experience and flexible meal frameworks based on a household’s individual needs. In doing so it also helps users develop the ability to build sustainable, simple, and convenient home cooking habits.

Saveful users simply ‘swipe right’ on tailor-made recipes to make the most of what is on hand based on their specific budget, taste, cooking skills, and dietary requirements.

Saveful ambassador Matt Moran said by being highly intuitive and motivating, the app will reward and help households understand what is in season and ultimately make reducing waste easy and empowering.

“It’s all about unleashing our food’s full potential, empowering Aussies to do more with less conveniently and helping households reduce food waste by taking something off the plate of busy families – not adding to it,” Moran said.

It is free and available on Apple and Android devices thanks to support form manufacturers, retailers, and government agencies, including Bega Group, Birds Eye, Goodman Fielder, Nestle, Qantas, Rabobank and the Queensland Government.

“Collective action is so critical to achieving our country’s goal of halving food waste by 2030. We are delighted to have the support and backing from a powerful group of brands, producers, retailers, and governments to deliver this positive tool to all Australians.

“Meaningful support that will enable simple and impactful actions at home that will have a tangible impact on our wallets and our planet,” McDonnell said.

Federal environment minister Tanya Plibersek said one third of the 7.6 million tonnes of food waste Australia produces each year comes from households, costing them $50 a week.

“There’s nothing tastier than a classic bubble and squeak, or fried rice made with leftover roast pork. Unless it’s a cold lamb sandwich with chutney, or a frittata made with roast vegies.

“We know Australians want to do their part to reduce waste. It takes governments, industry and communities working together. We’re committed to halving food waste by 2030, and projects like this will arm people with the information they need to make a difference,” Plibersek said.

The app offers chef hacks, tips and tricks from planning meals and grocery shopping, to how best to store and prep the products you've bought. It is also motivational by showing users the impact of their food tracking and monetary savings.

“Whether it’s using those items quickly approaching their used by dates, giving last night’s leftovers a makeover or simply serving up a delicious dish when the kids ask, ‘what’s for dinner tonight?’ Saveful enables Australians to serve up a meal with what they already have, puts to good use those often-forgotten items in the cupboard or fridge and prevents endless trips to the supermarket,” McDonnell said.

Birds Eye Marketing APAC senior director, Katie Saunders, said the company’s strong focus on sustainability meant supporting the Saveful project had the right fit.

“Birds Eye is more than just a box in your freezer. With a strong heritage and respect for resources, the brands’ portfolio includes frozen seafood, potatoes, vegetables, and plant-based products.

People have a great opportunity to reduce food waste by incorporating more frozen foods into their meals. Simply pull it out of the freezer, take the right portion and pop the rest right back,” Saunders said.

Goodman Fielder Sustainability lead, Rose Gooding, said, “Saveful is a fun, innovative and practical tool to help people avoid food waste in their homes.”

“We look forward to working with Saveful to help drive positive behaviour change by making the lives of consumers easier and empowering them to become more aware of how they can reduce waste, in turn saving money and helping create a more sustainable future.”

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