• Coco-Cola Amatil has committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2040 in the release of its latest sustainability goals, 2020-2040 Sustainability Ambitions.
    Coco-Cola Amatil has committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2040 in the release of its latest sustainability goals, 2020-2040 Sustainability Ambitions.
  • Coco-Cola Amatil has committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2040 in the release of its latest sustainability goals, 2020-2040 Sustainability Ambitions.
    Coco-Cola Amatil has committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2040 in the release of its latest sustainability goals, 2020-2040 Sustainability Ambitions.
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Coco-Cola Amatil has committed to net zero carbon emissions by 2040 in the release of its latest sustainability goals, 2020-2040 Sustainability Ambitions.

Group managing director Alison Watkins said the company had made good progress on its 2020 goals and the latest objectives were based on the areas Amatil could make the biggest difference and stakeholder expectations.

Snapshot:

  • 100% renewable electricity in Australia and New Zealand by 2025;
  • reduction of sugar (grams per 100ml) across non-alcoholic beverages portfolio of 35% in Indonesia and 20% in Australia and New Zealand by 2025;
  • partnering for pack-to-pack recycling solutions in all countries where we operate by 2030 and designing for 100% recyclability across all packaging; and
  • sustain net zero water operations.

Over the next 20 years, Amatil will prioritise four areas - water, consumer wellbeing, packaging, and carbon reduction.

Watkins said the plan builds on its original strategy released in 2018. “It is vital Amatil focus on the next phase of its sustainability journey on where it can make the biggest impact,” Watkins said.

The company said it would sustain its net zero water operations, only sourcing from sustainable water sources while improving vulnerability assessments, management plans, measurement, reporting and transparency for communities.

Consumer wellbeing by 2025 initiatives included leading on responsible consumption (alcohol abd non-alcohol) particularly in vulnerable communities and responsible marketing.

Its commitment to closing the loop on packaging by 2030 goals include:

  • pack-to-pack recycling solutions in all countries where it operates by 2030;
  • design for 100% recyclability and support well-designed infrastructure and initiatives for collection;
  • 50% average recycled or renewable content across all packaging by 2030; and
  • develop the feasibility of using average of 75% recycled or renewable plastic across its total PET packaging portfolio 2030.

Amatil said it would achieve net zero carbon emissions (Scope 1 and 2) by 2040. It would have 100 per cent renewable energy in Australia and New Zealand by 2025 and reduce other emissions in line with The Coca-Cola Company’s Science-Based Target of 25 per cent reduction by 2030 (vs 2015).

Greenpeace Reenergise campaign director Lindsay Soutar said Amatil’s commitment to 100 per cent renewable energy was a “big step in the right direction”.

“Greenpeace is the last organisation you’d expect to find cheering on an announcement from Coca-Cola Amatil. But in this instance we think they’re doing the right thing by switching to 100 per cent renewables, and committing to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2040,” Soutar said.

Amatil committing to the goal would put pressure on other major business, she added.

“Coca-Cola Amatil joins big brands like Woolworths, Bunnings and Telstra who’ve committed to 100% renewable electricity. They recognise that it’s a crucial part of their responsibility to tackle climate change, and increasingly, what their customers want to see.”

Soutar said Greenpeace was still calling on Amatil to commit all of its global operations to 100 per cent renewable electricity and join over 280 businesses worldwide in the RE100 initiative, which brings together some of the world’s largest and most ambitious companies on renewable energy.

Amatil said its achievements to date included:

  • 10% sugar reduction (grams per 100ml) in Australia;
  • 50% rPET in its portfolio;
  • achieved 17.2% sugar reduction in our Indonesia Non-Alcoholic Ready to Drink (NARTD) portfolio;
  • commissioned Phase 1 of South East Asia’s largest rooftop solar system in Cibitung, Indonesia;
  • signed Heads of Agreement with long-term packaging partner Dynapack to construct a state-of-the-art pack-to-pack PET recycling centre in Indonesia;
  • achieved best employer accreditation for the fifth consecutive year in New Zealand; and
  • screened at least 80% of supplier spend using responsible sourcing criteria in 2019 and extended this screening in 2020.

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