• SPX FLOW’s new Seamless Infusion Vessel can increase running times for less waste and more yield.
    SPX FLOW’s new Seamless Infusion Vessel can increase running times for less waste and more yield.
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Dairy, plant-based and beverage producers can struggle with product fouling or build up during UHT processing. SPX FLOW’s new Seamless Infusion Vessel can increase running times for less waste and more yield.    

UHT infusion systems process many popular products, including dairy (milk, cream and ice cream), plant-based beverages (soy, oat and almond drinks) and specialised nutrition foods (liquid meals, protein drinks and infant formula).

Instead of the traditional clamp connection, the seamless connection links the vessel bottom and pump housing in UHT infusion systems without a sealing gasket and has better water-cooling on the pump casing and impeller. This results in:  

No product build-up and decreased product loss: With less fouling, there are fewer stoppages for CIP (Cleaning-In-Place), which can take up to two hours per cleaning.  

Longer production runs before cleaning: Systems have shown 20 per cent longer running time using the Seamless Infusion Vessel. That’s an estimated 100 additional production hours and approximately 1.3 million more litres of milk produced yearly for a 12000-litre-per-hour plant.   

Increased system efficiency and overall sustainability: In a plant that can produce 12000 litres per hour, this means 30 fewer CIP cycles per year, which lowers product waste, energy, water and detergent consumption. 

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