• Treotham’s new plate strips made of igus high-performance plastics now offer even more freedom in the geometric design of its wear-resistant special part.
    Treotham’s new plate strips made of igus high-performance plastics now offer even more freedom in the geometric design of its wear-resistant special part.
Close×

The new abrasion-resistant iglidur sliding igus plate strips from Treotham Automation are made from high-performance plastics to give more geometric design options.

High-performance igus plastics from Treotham are routinely used in situations such as food technology that require freedom from lubricant, corrosion and maintenance.

In addition to the more than 50 high-performance igus polymers as plain bearings in the Treotham product range, the company also offers 27 of its materials as bar stock so customers can use the high-performance polymers to mill custom solutions and small batches themselves or order them from Treotham.

The company now also offers five of its materials as highly abrasion-resistant plate strips to give users more design freedom in terms of geometry when designing their wear-resistant special solution.

The sliding plates are manufactured by igus in Cologne in a newly built production facility and with advances in in-house development and production, further iglidur materials will be available in the future with plate strips in different thicknesses and lengths up to two metres.

All sliding plates now offered are in a 15 millimetre thickness and 160 millimetre width.

Packaging News

A Collective Action Group has been announced to drive 2025 National Packaging Targets includes leading industry and government representatives. Big names like Visy and Pact Group, Nestle, Coca-Cola Amatil, and Coles, David Jones and Country Road are among the line-up.

Supermarket giant Aldi is committing to dramatically reducing its plastic packaging, saying it will axe it by a quarter within the next six years, and it will cease supply of many single use plastic products by the end of next year.

In a world first, FMCG giant Procter & Gamble is set to pilot skincare products in refillable containers, which it says could dramatically reduce the amount of plastic used in the beauty category.